slow & simple Christmas traditions : hand stitched Christmas stockings

 

Part of my slow & simple seasonal Christmas was to make some new traditions. Or more like – redefine and place more ritual around them. Something like that. With my little one now big enough to understand all the Christmas magic, the big kids have been talking to him about a lot of how it all works. And we’re bringing it into our everyday for these weeks leading up to Christmas. I decided to do away with the pillowcases and make some hand stitched stockings for the kids – hopefully next year we’ll be able to find them to keep the traditions going!

I must admit I did take a little longer to come around to the Christmas magic this year, but then with a few twinkle lights in our life, and going out together to collect a tree (really it’s a fallen branch, with no leaves filled with our special decorations). The kids made treats to gift their friends – which I much prefer than just buying a packet of candy canes, I must admit. It makes me happy seeing them in the kitchen baking for other people, and then packaging it all up and writing notes to everyone.

 

So, this week I pulled out some felt fabric scraps and some strands of embroidery thread, and sat down to stitch the stockings for my three babies. I thought it would take a whole lot longer, but I kept it simple and these only took a few hours – with many get-up to see what Little One wants to read, eat, play, do, show me….. My girl is on holidays already, so she sat beside me and stitched her own; which made me immensely happy. Because really Christmas isn’t about stockings, or things, it’s about the creating of those things, the time spent together, talking while you’re making, thinking about the joy of reaching your hand inside on Christmas morning. Hanging them up along a beach-found branch. And nibbling on chocolates while you’re doing it.
That’s why I love using felt. These are actually made with some organic cotton quilt batting I had little scraps of. It’s soft like lambs wool, but perfectly easy to sew and won’t fray. Felt, old blankets, anything like that is great for kids to do their own stitching with, because you don’t need to worry about the edges fraying, so you can simply sew the sides together. And is it’s a little bit wonky, and some stitches go astray it doesn’t matter. One day in 3, or 5 or 10 years you’ll look at those stitches with the biggest smile and a pang in your heart.


Here’s how to make your own HandStitched Christmas Stockings:
+ Felt or an old blanket
+ A needle not too small, not too big
+ Embroidery thread in assorted colours
+ Ribbon or string or wool to make a hanging loop
+ A scrap of other fabric – we had some bird fabric, you could use flowers, Christmas trees, or even hand embroider whatever shapes you want. Stars, snowflakes…
+Draw the shape you want on scrap paper – make it bigger than you think, because a) the edges take up seam allowance, & b) more space for Santa’s gifts!

Trace the pattern piece onto your felt and cut out two pieces. It doesn’t matter with felt which side is the outside/right side and which side is the inside/wrong side, but if you’re using somewhat with an obvious outside/inside then make sure that you place the two layers together when cutting, with the wrong side facing each other.
With a light pencil draw the child’s initial on the front side of the stocking – if you have time / space their whole name can be lovely too. I’m working with simple and finished before Christmas!
Using whatever stitch you like – mine is a simple running stitch – hand stitch the name letter. Fancy lettering is pretty. Have you seen this amazing stitched alphabet? Again, I’m working on a time-frame + toddler-time… so simple letters still looks beautiful and works well.
Cut out and stitch on the design. I used running stitch that you can see, but you could also stitch it on with a hidden stitch.
Once you’ve added all the decorations you want to the outside pieces, lay the front and back pieces together and pin. Then blanket stitch around the whole edge. Make sure you stitch in the loop as you’re going. Maybe a few extra stitches on that part to make sure it doesn’t come out when the kids are enthusiastically pulling at their stockings!


Now – put on some twinkle lights, light some candles and hang those pretty stockings up ready for Santa. We leave home baked biscuits, some milk and possibly a chocolate for Santa, and of course Australian grown reindeer carrots for those hard-working reindeers who need as much energy as we can all give them!

 

*This post was sponsored by Woolworths Australia. Tutorial and all words are mine.

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